FWS did Accept Comments on the Subject

rulemaking process, though FWS did accept comments on the subject for consideration in a future rulemaking. The FWS is reviewing these comments to determine whether additional regulatory changes would be appropriate to reduce the burden on industry. G. Bureau of Reclamation The BOR is the second largest producer of hydroelectric power in the United States, operating 53 hydroelectric power facilities, comprising 14,730 megawatts of capacity. Each year, magnet ballsapproximately 3.5 million US homes),6 producing over one billion dollars in Federal revenue. In addition to our authorities to develop, operate, and maintain Federal hydropower facilities, BOR is also authorized to permit the use of our nonpowered assets to non-Federal entities for the purposes
magnetic ballsapproximately 3.5 million US homes),6 producing over one billion dollars in Federal revenue. In addition to our authorities to develop, operate, and maintain Federal hydropower facilities, BOR is also authorized to permit the use of our nonpowered assets to non-Federal entities for the purposes
sphere magnetsapproximately 3.5 million US homes),6 producing over one billion dollars in Federal revenue. In addition to our authorities to develop, operate, and maintain Federal hydropower facilities, BOR is also authorized to permit the use of our nonpowered assets to non-Federal entities for the purposes
magnetic balls toyBOR generates over 40 million megawatt-hours of electricity (the equivalent demand of approximately 3.5 million US homes),6 producing over one billion dollars in Federal revenue. In addition to our authorities to develop, operate, and maintain Federal hydropower facilities, BOR is also authorized to permit the use of our nonpowered assets to non-Federal entities for the purposes of hydropower development via a lease of power privilege (LOPP). The BOR is committed to facilitating the development of non-Federal hydropower at our existing Federal assets. Acting on this commitment, BOR has undertaken a number of activities, including: i. Completion of two publically available resource assessments. Assessments identify technical hydropower potential at existing BOR facilities, irrespective of financial viability. ii. Collaboration with stakeholder groups to improve the LOPP process and LOPP Directive and Standard (D&S) policy guidance document. A BOR LOPP is a contractual right given to a non-Federal entity to use a BOR asset (e.g. dam or conduit) for electric power generation consistent with BOR project purposes. The BOR has conducted LOPP outreach with stakeholder groups and hydropower industry associations; and made resources and staff available via a LOPP website: https://www.usbr.gov/power/LOPP/index.html. The BOR has also partnered with sister 6 See, https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=97&t=3 34 agencies (United States Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Energy) under the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower to, in part, encourage and streamline non-Federal development on Federal infrastructure. Through these activities, BOR has made resources available to developers and peeled back the barriers that may burden non-Federal hydropower development – while continuing to protect the Federal assets that our customers, operating partners, and stakeholders have depended on for over a century. The response BOR has received from these groups (including the development community) in this effort has been overwhelmingly positive. LOPP projects provide a source of reliable, domestic, and sustainable generation – that supports rural economies and the underlying Federal water resource project. H. Bureau of Indian Affairs The BIA provides services to nearly 2 million American Indians and Alaska Natives in 567 federally recognized tribes in the 48 contiguous States and Alaska. The BIA’s natural resource programs assist tribes in the management, development, and protection of Indian trust land and natural resources on 56 million surface acres and 59 million subsurface mineral estates. These programs enable tribal trust landowners to optimize sustainable stewardship and use of resources, providing benefits such as revenue, ring magnetNatives in 567 federally recognized tribes in the 48 contiguous States and Alaska. The BIA’s natural resource programs assist tribes in the management, development, and protection of Indian trust land and natural resources on 56 million surface acres and 59 million subsurface mineral
magnetic ringsNatives in 567 federally recognized tribes in the 48 contiguous States and Alaska. The BIA’s natural resource programs assist tribes in the management, development, and protection of Indian trust land and natural resources on 56 million surface acres and 59 million subsurface mineral
ring magnetsjobs and the protection of cultural, spiritual, and traditional resources. Income from energy production is the largest source of revenue generated from trust lands, with royalty income of $534 million in 2016. Indian Energy Actions i. Clarify “Inherently Federal Functions for Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs) Tribal Energy Resource Agreements (TERAs) are authorized under Title

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